Families
Food Insecurity
Source: Feeding America
Food Insecurity Rate
2017
Arkansas County19%
Ashley County19%
Baxter County14%
Benton County11%
Boone County15%
Bowie County, Texas22%
Bradley County20%
Calhoun County17%
Carroll County12%
Chicot County26%
Clark County20%
Clay County17%
Cleburne County15%
Cleveland County17%
Columbia County22%
Conway County17%
Craighead County17%
Crawford County14%
Crittenden County24%
Cross County19%
Dallas County19%
Desha County26%
Drew County21%
Faulkner County16%
Franklin County16%
Fulton County17%
Garland County17%
Grant County13%
Greene County15%
Hempstead County19%
Hot Spring County16%
Howard County17%
Independence County16%
Izard County16%
Jackson County20%
Jefferson County25%
Johnson County15%
Lafayette County22%
Lawrence County16%
Lee County26%
Lincoln County19%
Little River County18%
Logan County16%
Lonoke County14%
Madison County14%
Marion County15%
Miller County20%
Mississippi County23%
Monroe County24%
Montgomery County15%
Nevada County20%
Newton County14%
Ouachita County23%
Perry County15%
Phillips County30%
Pike County15%
Poinsett County18%
Polk County17%
Pope County16%
Prairie County17%
Pulaski County19%
Randolph County17%
Saline County12%
Scott County15%
Searcy County15%
Sebastian County17%
Sevier County12%
Sharp County17%
St. Francis County26%
Stone County17%
Union County20%
Van Buren County16%
Washington County14%
White County16%
Woodruff County22%
Yell County13%

Source: Feeding America




Food Insecure Households
2017
Arkansas County3,550
Ashley County4,030
Baxter County5,720
Benton County27,900
Boone County5,420
Bowie County, Texas20,180
Bradley County2,220
Calhoun County890
Carroll County3,430
Chicot County2,830
Clark County4,390
Clay County2,630
Cleburne County3,780
Cleveland County1,420
Columbia County5,310
Conway County3,590
Craighead County17,980
Crawford County8,600
Crittenden County11,750
Cross County3,170
Dallas County1,460
Desha County3,100
Drew County3,960
Faulkner County19,680
Franklin County2,850
Fulton County2,000
Garland County16,280
Grant County2,430
Greene County6,670
Hempstead County4,230
Hot Spring County5,210
Howard County2,310
Independence County5,740
Izard County2,130
Jackson County3,550
Jefferson County17,620
Johnson County4,020
Lafayette County1,540
Lawrence County2,710
Lee County2,520
Lincoln County2,570
Little River County2,300
Logan County3,490
Lonoke County9,940
Madison County2,210
Marion County2,510
Miller County8,610
Mississippi County10,160
Monroe County1,770
Montgomery County1,350
Nevada County1,720
Newton County1,120
Ouachita County5,570
Perry County1,520
Phillips County5,750
Pike County1,600
Poinsett County4,240
Polk County3,440
Pope County10,130
Prairie County1,400
Pulaski County75,980
Randolph County2,890
Saline County13,850
Scott County1,580
Searcy County1,190
Sebastian County20,970
Sevier County2,080
Sharp County2,970
St. Francis County6,860
Stone County2,140
Union County7,940
Van Buren County2,720
Washington County32,140
White County12,510
Woodruff County1,480
Yell County2,840

Source: Feeding America
Notes: Food insecurity refers to USDA’s measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. Food-insecure households are not necessarily food insecure all the time. Food insecurity may reflect a household’s need to make trade-offs between important basic needs, such as housing or medical bills, and purchasing nutritionally adequate foods.



NATIONAL RANKING
50

OUT OF 51
2017

STATE TREND

Decreasing


17%

2017
1% = 29,998
People

What does this measure?

The percentage of households that lack access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and/or experience limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.

Why is this important?

Food insecurity is one way to measure and asses the risk of hunger. Being food insecure is stressful, and food insecurity makes it difficult for children to learn and grow. Financially stressed families often need to choose between spending money on healthy food or other basic needs such as housing or health expenses.

How is Arkansas doing?

In 2017, 17% of state residents were food insecure, down slightly from 20% in 2013. The national rate was 13% in 2017, making Arkansas 50th in the nation on this indicator. Among counties in the state, food insecurity was highest in Phillips County at 30% at lowest in Benton County at 11%.

Notes about the data

Feeding America estimates the level of food insecurity in counties by analyzing the relationship between reported food insecurity and related indicators such as poverty, unemployment, homeownership at the state level, then applying that knowledge to generate estimates based on county data on poverty, unemployment and similar indicators.




Source: Feeding America


Food Insecurity Rate
20132014201520162017
Arkansas20%19%18%17%17%

Source: Feeding America




Food Insecure Households
20132014201520162017
Arkansas584,270567,250549,070515,270518,960

Source: Feeding America
Notes: Food insecurity refers to USDA’s measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. Food-insecure households are not necessarily food insecure all the time. Food insecurity may reflect a household’s need to make trade-offs between important basic needs, such as housing or medical bills, and purchasing nutritionally adequate foods.










INDICATORS TREND | STATE
Access to Quality Seats for Infants and Toddlers Increasing
Access to Quality Childcare Seats for Preschoolers Maintaining
Grade 3 Reading Increasing
Grade 8 Math Increasing
Graduation Rate Increasing
Remediation Rate Decreasing
Adults with a High School Degree Increasing
Adults with a Bachelor's Degree or Higher Increasing
Adults Pursuing Further Education Decreasing
Infant Mortality Maintaining
Early Prenatal Care Increasing
Overweight or Obese Students Maintaining
Student Drug Usage Decreasing
Overweight or Obese Adults Increasing
Physically Inactive Adults Increasing
Smoking Rate Decreasing
Flouridated Water Increasing
Insurance Coverage Rates Increasing
Oral Health Increasing
Life Expectancy Increasing
Routine Check-ups Increasing
Births to Teens Decreasing
Female-headed Households Increasing
Children Living in Poverty Increasing
People Living in Poverty Increasing
Elderly Living in Poverty Decreasing
Median Household Income Maintaining
Unemployment Rate Decreasing
Homeownership Rate Decreasing
Child Abuse and Neglect Decreasing
Access to Financial Services Decreasing
Food Insecurity Decreasing
Incarceration Rate Increasing
Homelessness Decreasing
Change in Total Jobs Increasing
Housing Affordability - Owning Maintaining
Housing Affordability - Renting Increasing
Voter Participation Rate Decreasing
Charitable Giving Increasing
Volunteering Increasing
Group Participation Increasing
Connection to Neighbors Decreasing
Local Voting Not Applicable
Change in Population Increasing
Change in Population by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Change in Population by Age Not Applicable


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